Kamis, 16 November 2017

COMPARATIVE AND SUPERLATIVE ADJECTIVES



Hi! Hi! Today, I will share about comparative and superlative adjectives. Let's begin to discuss it, guys.


v  After comparatives, we use than:
Examples:
-          I am taller than you.
-          It’s cheaper to go by car than to go by train.


v  We use –er for the comparatives of short adjectives and adverbs:
Examples:
1.      Cheap àcheaper
2.      Hard àharder
3.      Large àlarger
4.      Thin àthinner



v  We prefer –er with some two syllable adjectives, especially adjectives ending in –y.
Examples:
1.      Lucky àluckier
2.      Funny àfunnier
3.      Easy àeasier
4.      Pretty àprettier



v  We use more…for other two syllable adjective and longer adjectives.
Examples:
1.      More modern
2.      More serious
3.      More expensive
4.      More comfortable


v  We also use more…for adverbs which end in –ly.
Examples:
1.      More slowly
2.      More seriously
3.      More quietly
4.      More carefully
Note: We say earlier (not ‘more early’)


v   Before the comparative of adjectives and adverbs, we can use:
1.      A bit
2.      A little
3.      Much
4.      A lot
5.      Far (=a lot)


v  Some adjectives and adverbs have irregular comparative forms.
Examples:
1.      Good/Well      à Better
2.      Bad/Badly       à Worse
3.      Far                   à Further (or farther)
                                    Further can also mean more or additional.
4.      Old                  àOlder/Elder
    We use elder when we are talking about members of a family. 
    We say (my) elder brother/sister/son/daughter.
    We use elder only before a noun.


v  We can use two comparatives together to say that something is changing continuously.
Examples:
1.      Harder and harder.
2.      More and more
3.      More and more difficult


v  We use as…..as/not so….as to say something is same.
Examples:
1.      As old as
2.      As well as


v  We can also use as….as…(but not ‘so….as’) in positive and in questions.


v  We say the same as (not ‘the same like’)


v  We use –est or most….to form the superlative of adjectives and adverbs.


v  -est for shorter words and most….for longer words.
Examples:
1.   Long àlongest
2.   Hot àhottest
3.   Easy àeasiest
4.   Hard àhardest
5.      Most famous
6.      Most boring
7.      Most difficult
8.      Most expensive


v  Some adjectives and adverbs have irregular superlatives forms
Examples:
1.      Old àOldest/Eldest
We use eldest when we are talking about the members of a family.
2.      Good àBest
3.      Bad àWorst


v  After superlative, we use in with places (town, building, etc).


v  We also use (the best…) in the class/in the team/in the company, etc.



v  Wes sometimes use most + adjective (without ‘the’) to mean very.

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