Kamis, 09 November 2017

Travelling or Traveling? Which one is correct?


Hi! Good morning, guys. I hope you're healthy and happy today. For the second English Post, I'll share about the different between American English and British English. As we know, there are a few grammatical differences between British English and American English. So, let's begin to discuss it.

BRITISH

The present perfect is used for an action in the past with a result now:
· I’ve lost my key. Have you seen it?



· Sally isn’t here. She’s gone out.



The present perfect is used with just, already and yet:
· I’m not hungry. I’ve just had lunch.



· A: What time is he leaving?
B: He has already left.



·   Have you finished your work yet?


Have a bath / have a shower


Will or shall can be used with I/we:
·      I will/shall be late this evening.
The question shall I…? and shall we…? Are used to ask for advice etc:
·      Which way shall we go?


You can use needn’t (do) or don’t need to (do) :
·       We needn’t hurry. Or We don’t need to hurry.


After demand, insist etc. you can use should:
· I demand that he should apologise.
· We insisted that something should be done about the problem.
AMERICAN

The present perfect OR past simple can be used:
· I’ve lost my key. Have you seen it? or I lost my key. Did you see it?


·  Sally isn’t here. 
  (She's gone out. / She went out)


The present perfect OR past simple can be used:
· I’m not hungry. 
  (I've just had lunch. / I just lunch)


·  A: What time is he leaving?
 B: - He has already left.
     - He already left.


· Have you finished your work yet? or Did you finish your work yet?

Take a bath / take a shower


Shall is unusual:
· I will be late this evening.
Should I? and should we…? Are used to ask for advice etc:
·   Which way should we go?


Needn’t is unusual. The usual form is don’t need to:
·  We don’t need to hurry



The subjunctive is normally used. Should is unusual after demand, insist etc.:
·  I demanded that he apologize.*
· We insisted that something be done about the problem.

*Many verbs ending in –ise in British English (apologise/organise/specialise, etc.) are spelt with –ize (apologize/organize/specialized, etc.) in American English.

 And, now, let's discuss the other differences of British and American English. We sometimes feel confuse to determine it's correct or not, whereas both of them are correct. So, let's learn more about them.

BRITISH

British speakers say “to/in hospital’ (without ‘the’):
·      Three people were injured and taken to hospital.


Nouns like government/team/family etc. can have a singular or plural verb:
·      The team is/are playing well.


At the weekend / at weekends:
·      Will you be here at the weekend?

In a street:
·      Do you live in this street?


Different from or different to:
·      It was different from (or to) what I’d expected.


Write to somebody:
·      Please write to me soon.
AMERICAN

American speakers say ‘to/in the hospital’:

·      Three people were injured and taken to the hospital.



These nouns normally take a singular verb in American English:
·      The team is playing well.


On the weekend / on weekends:
·      Will you be here on the weekend?


On a street:
·      Do you live on this street?


Different from or different than:
·      It was different from (or than) what I’d expected.


Write (to) somebody (with or without ‘to’):
·       Please write (to) me soon.




BRITISH

The verbs in this section (burn, spoil etc.) can be regular or irregular (burned or burnt, spoiled, or spoilt etc.).


The past participle of get is got:
·       Your English has got much better.
(= has become much better)
Have got is also an alternative to have:
·       I’ve got two brothers. (= I have two brothers.)


Travel à travelling / travelled
Cancel à cancelling / cancelled
AMERICAN

The verbs in this section are normally regular (burned, spoiled etc.).




The past participle of get is gotten:
·      Your English has gotten much better.
Have got = have (as in British English)
·      I’ve got two brothers






Travel à traveling / traveled
Cancel à canceling / canceled



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